Don't Ask Me About Tennis.

Written By The Tri Doc on June 16, 2016

I was talking about a few different things with a training buddy of mine and we stumbled across this concept. Here it goes: I played tennis when I was in high school. I was on the team and was an average player. With that being said, I enjoyed tennis. I enjoyed playing, watching and talking about tennis. I knew what racquets were the best and could argue why. I knew the shoes and what outfits to wear. With that being said, I have only played tennis a few times since and still have the racquet I played with in high school (20 years ago).

While I still like and enjoy tennis, I know very little about it. I have lost the ability to play at any capacity and while I could still "hit" back and forth, I am not the player I used to be. With that being the case, I don't go around advising people how to play tennis or what equipment they should buy. I honestly don't have a clue. That is not necessarily a bad thing, it's just no longer my field/hobby/interest. 

I find the same true in other areas of my life. I think there are people out there advising about activities/sports/health/injures among others that don't really have any business doing that. In my field of sports chiropractic in Cedar Park, Texas I see a lot of this. I will have a person come in complaining about pain while running and now their back, knee, neck, hamstring or whatever is hurting. Most people will tell me that they heard _____________ (fill in about any answer) and this is not working. While it doesn't surprise me, it has led me to discuss this concept with many of my friends.  I think we need to take expert advice from the experts. Pretty simple concept, yet often forgotten. 

I am always working on improving my triathlon skills. My most recent improvements have come through running. I have lots of running friends. I can call on many people, but here is what I choose to do. Instead of calling someone who ran track 20 years ago, I call a friend of mine who won a half marathon this year beating about 8000 people. This guy can move. He is at a level most people will never reach, but he can give me ideas and concepts along with advice on how to improve where I am personally. He gives me valuable advice on how I can push myself to the next level. What he tells me is current, relevant and works. That's the kind of advice I/we need to be able to succeed.

I love the way Dave Ramsey puts it " If you want fiancial advice, don't call your broke brother-in-law." It's a simple statement that speaks volumes. We need to get advice from people who are at a level above us, not below us.

I think this concept works in all areas of our life. We need to look for advice on many topics including spiritual, financial, health, marriage, parenting, business and many others. Remember to take advice from those that care about you. So if you want advice about sports injury, back pain or headaches, call me. Advice about tennis? Call someone else.